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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Indoor air pollution by formaldehyde in European countries found in the catalog.

Indoor air pollution by formaldehyde in European countries

H. Knoeppel

Indoor air pollution by formaldehyde in European countries

by H. Knoeppel

  • 232 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Commission of the European Communities in Luxembourg .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementH. Knoeppel, L. Mølhave, B. Seifert.
SeriesEnvironment and quality of life
ContributionsMølhave, L., Seifert, B.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21116873M
ISBN 100119728257
OCLC/WorldCa41803268

  We reviewed the main epidemiological studies that evaluate the respiratory effects of indoor air pollutants quantitatively in industrialised countries. Consistent results support short-term (aggravation) and, although more rarely, long-term (prevalence augmentation) effects on asthma, chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in indoor settings with poor air by: Another study estimated the cost of air pollution (indoor and outdoor pollution) of 53 countries in the European Region at $ trillion. This is nearly 1/10 of the gross domestic product (GDP) of the entire European Union If you look at the other side of the equation, billions of dollars could be saved if weFile Size: 1MB.

Exposure to indoor formaldehyde pollution is likely to cause Headaches, chronic breathing problems, dizziness, sore throat Respiratory illnesses in developing countries are most likely to be caused by.   A study published in the International Journal of Science highlighted that 22 percent of premature deaths caused by air pollution happened in countries that produce (cheap) goods for export to developed countries [6].

INDOOR AIR QUALITY RELATED STANDARDS IN CHINA Z Bai1*, C Jia1, T Zhu1 and J Zhang2 1 College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin, China 2 Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, UMDNJ and Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ , USA ABSTRACT In , the Chinese national standard entitled “Code for Indoor Environmental PollutionFile Size: KB. () and high formaldehyde concentrations in mobile homes in the United States (). However, in , formaldehyde discussions were generally taken up again when formaldehyde was considered as carcinogenic for humans. As a consequence, various authorities and institu-tions have proposed new indoor air guidelines, giving values.


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Indoor air pollution by formaldehyde in European countries by H. Knoeppel Download PDF EPUB FB2

Indoor air pollution is the term used to describe exposure to certain substances found in homes, schools, transport and subway stations.

Over different compounds have been detected in indoor air and some pollutants may be times more concentrated inside rather than outside buildings. Indoor air quality (IAQ) is the air quality within and around buildings and is known to affect the health, comfort and well-being of building occupants.

Poor indoor air quality has been linked to sick building syndrome, reduced productivity and impaired learning in schools. IAQ can be affected by gases (including carbon monoxide, radon, volatile organic compounds), particulates.

Formaldehyde's Impact on Indoor Air Quality. Formaldehyde is an important chemical used widely by industry to manufacture building materials and numerous household products.

It is also a by-product of combustion and certain other natural processes. Thus, it may be present in substantial concentrations both indoors and outdoors. Indoor concentrations and relationship with outdoor levels.

A large review of formaldehyde concentrations worldwide in all types of indoor environment, including mobile homes, has been summarized by Salthammer et al.

().A second large review compiles information on indoor, outdoor and personal exposures to formaldehyde ().During a large indoor air survey carried out in homes by the Building.

NCEH provides leadership to promote health and quality of life by preventing or controlling those diseases, birth defects, or disabilities resulting from interaction between people and the environment.

Site has information/education resources on a broad range of topics, including asthma, birth defects, radiation, sanitation, lead in blood, and more. The WHO guidelines for indoor air quality, developed under the coordination of WHO/Europe, address three groups of issues that are most relevant for public health: biological indoor air pollutants (dampness and mould) pollutant-specific guidelines (chemical pollution) pollutants from indoor combustion of fuels.

In Korea, the indoor formaldehyde was set at ppm (8 h) according to the Air Quality Standard in Office and Indoor Air Quality Management Act in The Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) in Japan laid down an indoor air guideline value of ppm ( h) in June Guidelines for good indoor air quality in office premises were Cited by: Indoor air pollution in developing nations is a significant form of indoor air pollution (IAP) that is little known to those in the developed world.

Three billion people in developing countries across the globe rely on biomass, in the form of wood, charcoal, dung, and crop residue, as their domestic cooking much of the cooking is carried out indoors in environments that lack proper.

The Inside Story: A Guide to Indoor Air Quality. This is our most popular and comprehensive publication on the subject of Indoor Air Quality. While dated, it is still relevant as it describes sources of air pollution in the home and office, corrective strategies, and specific measures for reducing pollutant levels.

Indoor air pollution is one of the world’s largest environmental problems – particularly for the poorest in the world who often do not have access to clean fuels for cooking. The Global Burden of Disease is a major global study on the causes and risk factors for death and disease published in the medical journal The Lancet.

1 These estimates of the annual number of deaths attributed to a Cited by: 1. Formaldehyde MSDS sheets: This FORMALDEHYDE MSDS [PDF] from Mallinckrodt Chemicals notes that typical composition of formaldehyde in industrial use is comprised of 37% formaldehyde, % methyl alcohol, and the remainder water.

Synonyms for formaldehyde exposure are Formaldehyde 37%, Formalin, Morbicid Acid, Methylene Oxide, Methyl aldehyde, all bearing the CAS No.: and. from book Formaldehyde and Cognition buildings in European Union (EU) countries (Sarigiannis et al.

Uchiyama I () The regulations for indoor air pollution in Japan: a public health. This is potentially a serious indoor air problem in EU. More research is needed to understand the associations to health effects and seriousness of the problem in EU countries. Combined and mixture effects of indoor air pollutants can so far only rarely be assessed.

There are not enough data on combined effects and also the methodology is limited. Formaldehyde, the simplest aldehyde, is used to manufacture of a number of household and building materials, particularly polymers.

Indoor pollution levels improve through increased ventilation and the removal of furniture or building materials with high levels of formaldehyde. xxv + pages ISBN 92 4 CHF In developing countries: CHF Order no.

This book presents WHO guidelines for the protection of public health from a number of chemicals commonly present in indoor air. Role of human exposure assessment in air quality management: report on the joint workshop of the World Health Organization, the Joint Research Centre and the European Concerted Action "Urban Air, Indoor Environment and Human Exposure" Bonn, Germany October .

In the rural areas of developing countries some 80% of households rely on biomass fuels for cooking and often heating as well and so suffer high indoor air pollution.

Report No. 7: lndoor air pollution by formaldehyde in European Countries. Report No. 8: Guideline for the characterization of volatile organic compounds emitted from indoor materials and products using small test chambers.

Report No. 9: Project inventory - 2nd updated edition. Report No. Effects of indoor air pollution on human Size: 2MB. Formaldehyde is an important precursor to many other materials and chemical compounds.

Inthe installed capacity for the production of formaldehyde was estimated at million tons per year. It is mainly used in the production of industrial resins, e.g., for particle board and coatings.

In view of its widespread use, toxicity, and volatility, formaldehyde poses a significant danger to Chemical formula: CH₂O. Formaldehyde levels in indoor air are almost always higher than in outdoor air.

Outdoor levels of for- maldehyde are generally less than mg/m3, even though a level of mg/m3 was recorded prior to the implementation of automotive emission controls (NAS, ).Cited by:. Report to Congress on Indoor Air Quality, VolumeII: Assessment and Control of Indoor Air Pollution, pp.

I, EPAIC, 3. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Public Health Service, and National Environment Health Association. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality: A Reference Manual, p EPA, 4. Indoor air pollution is ubiquitous, and takes many forms, ranging from smoke emitted from solid fuel combustion, especially in households in developing countries, to complex mixtures of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds present in modern by: Until recently, the health effects of indoor air pollution have received relatively little attention from the scientific community.

Prior to the s, problems with indoor air quality in residences and the non-industrial workplace were occasionally investigated, but the level of interest was low (Stolwijk, ). Even today, the bulk of public Cited by: